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Juncos, Junco Pictures

Junco In Pine Tree


Junco In Pine Tree

Dark-Eyed Junco Perched


Dark-Eyed Junco Perched

Dark-Eyed Junco With Bug


Dark-Eyed Junco With Bug

Junco Hyemalis


Junco Hyemalis

Junco Hyemalis Hyemalis


Junco Hyemalis Hyemalis

Slate-Colored Junco


Slate-Colored Junco

Slate-colored dark-eyed Junco


Slate-colored dark-eyed Junco

Slate Junco


Slate Junco

Slate colored junco


Slate colored junco

Junco


Junco
In 1973, 5 sub-species of Juncos were grouped into a single species known as the  Dark-eyed Junco. The 5 species are all close in habitat, but differ in coloring and range.

The Dark-eyed Junco is abundant throughout North America. The sub-specie, Slate-Colored Junco is found predominantly in the Eastern United States. They have a very distinct, uniformly gray or black head and body with white stomachs and under tail feathers. They have cute, short, pink beaks. Juncos are members of the American sparrow family and baby juncos can easily be mistaken for a Vesper Sparrow because of it's streaked body markings.

Juncos spend most of their time on the ground. They hop along, rather than walk. They mainly feed on the ground, eating seeds knocked off feeders by other birds, as well as seeds and berries in the wild. They also nest on the ground. Females build their nests on the ground, hidden by a tree, roots or shrub. The junco has a brood of 3-5 eggs that are white or blue-white in color. Babies stay in the nest for 12-13 days.