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Brown-eyed Susans, Brown-eyed Susan Pictures, Facts, and Information

Two brown eyed susans


Two brown eyed susans

Brown eyed susan in sun


Brown eyed susan in sun

Brown eyed susans landscape


Brown eyed susans landscape

Curled brown eyed susan


Curled brown eyed susan
Brown-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta), also called Black-Eyed Susan, is a member of the sunflower family.  It is native to North America, and varieties can be found from Newfoundland to New Mexico.
Brown-Eyed Susan is one of the common names for several flowering plants in the Rudbeckia genus. Other common names include Black-Eyed Susan, Brown Betty, Golden Jerusalem and Yellow Ox-Eye Daisy, among others. 

Brown-Eyed Susan grows all over the USA, and its range extends to southern Canada--from Newfoundland to British Columbia. It is the state flower of Maryland, selected in 1918.  Although it is a native plant and grows wild throughout its range, several varieties have been cultivated for garden use--some favorites are called "Marmalade", "Double Gold" and "Indian Summer".

Varieties of Brown-Eyed Susan grow anywhere from three to six feet tall (one to two meters), and the flowers usually measure four to six inches (ten to fifteen centimeters) in diameter, though some garden varieties have flowers that can reach twelve inches (thirty centimeters) in diameter.  It is sun-loving, but is very hardy and will grow wild in a wide variety of conditions.  It is commonly found in fields and ditches, and can be seen growing along highways throughout the central United States.

Brown-Eyed Susan has many uses in traditional herbal medicine:  Some Native American tribes have used it as a poultice for snake bites, to make tea to treat colds and worms in children (Ojibwa), and as a diuretic (Manominee and Patawotomi).  Additionally, tea made from Brown-Eyed Susan has been used as an astringent to wash sores and wounds, and juice from the roots has been used as drops to treat earaches.