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Goldfinches, Goldfinch Pictures, Facts, and Information
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Male Goldfinch Perched


Male Goldfinch Perched

Male Gold Finch Perched


Male Gold Finch Perched

Female Goldfinch Perched


Female Goldfinch Perched

Female goldfinch hanging from thistle


Female goldfinch hanging from thistle

Male goldfinch on thistle


Male goldfinch on thistle
Male goldfinch on thistle

Goldfinch on door


Goldfinch on door

Two goldfinches on feeder


Two goldfinches on feeder

Female Goldfinch on birdfeeder


Female Goldfinch on birdfeeder

Goldfinch on birdfeeder


Goldfinch on birdfeeder
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American or EasternGoldfinches, also known as wild canaries, are common birds throughout North America.  It is the state bird of Iowa, Washington and New Jersey.

After they molt in the spring, the male birds are an unmistakeable bright yellow color. They also have a black cap and black wings with white markings. The female is mostly brown, but wears duller yellow feathers on her stomach. head and back. Her tail and wings have a darker brown coloring. The gold finch is the only bird that moults twice a year. Not only do they molt in the spring, but in the winter it sheds moults all of its feathers.

The American goldfinch is monogamous and nests very late in the bird season. These birds nest in the late summer and early fall.  Both the male and female collect materials to build their nest, but the female goldfinch builds the entire thing in a tree about 30 feet off the ground. They have one brood of 4-6 blue-white to blue-green colored eggs. They remain fed by their parents for up to 3 weeks.

The goldfinch generally stays in flocks, except during breeding season when the males become territorial of their nests and their partner.  They are abundant at household feeders and are especially fond of thistle seed. They are a fan of bird and alder seeds and will eat insects and berries too.