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Pictures of Baltimore Orioles, Baltimore Oriole Facts
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Baltimore oriole on feeder


Baltimore oriole on feeder

Baltimore oriole on feeder

Oriole on branch


Oriole on branch
Oriole on branch
Oriole on branch
Oriole on branch

Oriole on ground


Oriole on ground

Baltimore oriole on trail


Baltimore oriole on trail
Baltimore oriole on trail
Baltimore oriole on trail
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The Baltimore Oriole, named because its colors resemble the colors on Lord Baltimore's coat-of-arms, is a beautiful, brightly colored bird.

As it usually is in nature, the male oriole has brighter, more outstanding colors. He sports a bright orange belly and black head and back, with white trim on his wings. The female sports a slightly duller orange belly, sometimes with a bit of grey mixed in. She has brownish wings with white markings.

The Balitmore Oriole, the state bird of Maryland, is found around the eastern half of North America. The Bullocks Oriole is the Baltimore's counterpart, found in the western half. They appear very similiar in size and coloring. They migrate to Mexico, South and Central America for the winter.

Baltimore Orioles eat mostly insects, berries and fruit. They also seem to love suet in the feeders, especially if there is peanut butter added to it. They prefer woodlands to make their homes. 

These birds have a particularly interesting nest structure. They make their nests in deciduous trees, 25-60 feet off the ground.  The nest actually hangs from the end of a branch, almost like a purse hanging on a doorknob.  They offer up one set of 4 eggs (brood) per year. Their eggs are white or light blue with blotches of blacks and browns at the larger end. Incubation is 12-14 days.  Baby birds then stay in the nest, fed by both parents, for an additional 12-14 days. 25-60 feet is a long way down for those baby birds!