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Pictures of Robins, Robin Facts
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Picture Of A Robin In A Tree


Picture Of A Robin In A Tree

Red Breasted Robin


Red Breasted Robin

Robin standing in grass


Robin standing in grass

Robin with worms in beak


Robin with worms in beak

Red robin breast on branch


Red robin breast on branch
Robin standing in grass

Robin in grass holding grub


Robin in grass holding grub

Robins nest with babies


Robins nest with babies

Robin feeding worms to babies close up


Robin feeding worms to babies close up

Robin with worm


Robin with worm
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Pictures of robins that I've taken at my house.

 
You know spring is here when you see your first American Robin in the Northeast. You might first notice them on the lawn pulling up earthworms, often in grassy patches on the side of the road, hopping around doing the same. These Robins migrate south to warmer weather in the winter and can be found in huge groupings along the Gulf of Mexico.  In the Northeast they can be seen again around March or April.

The American Robin is about 10 inches high and known for it's orange-red breast. Males have more reddish orange breast than females, which is more of a brownish orange. Both have dark brown wings and upperparts. Males have a black head and tail and a white eye ring. Males also have a white throat with black striping. Females have a dark brown head and no eye ring or throat striping. Both have yellow beaks. Juvenile Robins have white spotted underparts, back and shoulders.

American Robins feast on worms, caterpillars, berries and fruit, beetles, crickets and spiders. They forage in field and on lawns. They have a cute way of running and stopping to eat. One Robin can eat as much as 14 feet of earthworms in one day!

Female Robins start building their first nests in April and another nest later in the season, as late as August. The male does not help build, but will sometimes bring supplies.  Nests can usually be found in trees, protected from the rain. Nests are built anywhere from 5 to 70 feet off the ground. Robins usually have 2 broods of 4 eggs a season. Their eggs are green-blue in color and about the size of a quarter. Babies stay in the nest roughly 2 weeks before they learn to fly.