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Pictures of Tigers, Tiger Facts
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Bengal Tiger Yawning


Bengal Tiger Yawning

Bengal Tiger Yawning

White Tiger Eye Closeup


White Tiger Eye Closeup

White Tiger Licking


White Tiger Licking

White Tiger Resting


White Tiger Resting

White Tiger Standing


White Tiger Standing
White Tiger Standing

White Tiger With Ball


White Tiger With Ball

Tiger Water


Tiger Water

Adolescent white tiger


Adolescent white tiger
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Information about tigers and more than fifty highly-detailed tiger pictures that I've taken around the world.  Includes white tigers and bengal tigers, at rest and in action.

Animal: Tiger

Species: There are 6 living subspecies of Tiger including the Bengal Tiger, Indochinese Tiger, Malayan Tiger, Sumatran Tiger, Siberian Tiger, and the South China Tiger. The Balinese, Caspian, and Java Tiger are extinct.

Lifespan: Tiger live about 15 to 20 years in the wild.

Size & Weight: The size and weight of Tigers depends on which subspecies they belong to. The largest Tiger is the Siberian Tiger and it grows to be about 10 ft long and 400 lbs. The smallest of the tigers is the Sumatran Tiger which grows to be about 8ft long and 230 lbs.

Habitat:  Most Tigers can be found in small areas within Asia. They are very good at adapting and can live in a variety of climates from tropical forests, to marshes, snowy evergreen forests, and tall grasslands. Siberian tigers live in the birch forests of Russia.

Family Life:  Tigers live on their own. When a female tiger gives birth, she raises the cubs without the father's help until the cubs are two or three years old. Once they reach that age they go off on their own like the rest of the adult Tigers and fend for themselves. Tigers are very territorial and mark their land with their scent to keep others away.

*Fun Facts*

  • Tigers like to swim and play in snow.
  • All tigers have their own unique stripe pattern. Often, scientists will use their unique stripes to tell them apart.
  • Tigers learn to hunt by the time they are 18 months old, and go off on their own when they are 2 or 3 years old.